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Испанская лотерея euromillions (5 из 50 + 2 из 12)

Sum of Prizes Won in Each Prize Tier

The following amounts include all winners from all participating countries.

Prize Total % of Total
Match 5+2 €17,355,540,745.00 39.18%
Match 5+1 €3,122,627,034.41 7.05%
Match 5 €790,448,279.50 1.78%
Match 4+2 €426,694,479.57 0.96%
Match 4+1 €331,466,142.60 0.75%
Match 3+2 €321,690,136.10 0.73%
Match 4 €275,043,628.60 0.62%
Match 2+2 €1,278,521,686.80 2.89%
Match 3+1 €1,387,668,055.50 3.13%
Match 3 €1,759,833,965.40 3.97%
Match 1+2 €3,234,397,537.30 7.30%
Match 2+1 €8,388,667,513.70 18.94%
Match 2 €5,148,268,386.60 11.62%
Etoile+ Prizes* €474,764,796.80 1.07%
Grand Total €44,295,632,387.88 100%

€3,122,627,034.41
€790,448,279.50
€426,694,479.57
€331,466,142.60
€321,690,136.10
€275,043,628.60
€1,278,521,686.80
€1,387,668,055.50
€1,759,833,965.40
€3,234,397,537.30
€8,388,667,513.70

Types of EuroMillions Scams

EuroMillions scams can turn the popular dream of winning a jackpot into a costly nightmare. Here are some of the most popular methods used by fraudsters.

The first point of contact is generally made using one of the following approaches:

Direct Mail

A letter is sent through the post informing the recipient that they have won a lottery prize and need to register their claim in order for their winnings to be processed.

Telephone

A ‘lottery official’ calls the potential victim to tell them about the ‘good news’ and, during the telephone call, will try to extract a payment and/or bank details under the pretence that a ‘processing fee’ or ‘tax’ needs to be paid.

Some scammers have taken to selling fake lottery tickets over the phone. They will ask for payment upfront, requiring the target to disclose their bank details, but the tickets are never sent as they do not exist.

Mobile

A text message is sent informing the recipient that their mobile number was entered into a raffle or lottery and selected at random as the winner.

About UK Millionaire Maker

The EuroMillions UK Millionaire Maker guarantees that at least one player in the UK will win £1 million in every EuroMillions draw. As the two games are played separately, it is possible to win a prize in both the main EuroMillions game and Millionaire Maker, so players are advised to check their tickets carefully.

How it Works

The odds of winning the UK Millionaire Maker game vary depending on the number of players in each game. For example, a Tuesday EuroMillions draw tends to attract fewer players, meaning your odds of winning in midweek are better than on a Friday.

Millionaire Maker codes can start with the letter H, J, M, T, V, X or Z , and the chances of winning are exactly the same for each code. Visit the How it Works page for a more detailed explanation about how the Millionaire Maker codes are selected and how the odds vary from draw to draw.

European Millionaire Maker works in a similar way, but is open to everyone who plays a line in any of the nine participating EuroMillions nations, and the first letter of the code will be different in each country.

How to Claim

If you have won a UK Millionaire Maker prize, then you need to claim within 180 days of the draw date, as per the UK EuroMillions Rules. If you do not claim in time, your prize, and the interest that has accumulated, will be allocated to the lottery’s Good Causes fund.

View the How to Claim page for more information.

History of the UK Millionaire Maker

12th January 2019 – To increase the amount of Millionaire Maker special event draws that are held, the number of codes in every standard draw decreased from two to one. The first special event draw is scheduled for spring 2019, when 40 UK millionaires will be created in one night.

24th September 2016 – The number of Millionaire Maker prizes on offer in a standard draw doubled to two. Mega Friday became Mega Week, providing even more exciting prizes and luxury experiences.

31st October 2014 – Millionaire Raffle became Millionaire Maker and the first Mega Friday draw was held, rewarding 25 players with £1 million and a VIP trip to Makepeace Island in Australia.

March 2014 – The National Lottery applied for permission to rename Millionaire Raffle as Millionaire Maker and provide non-cash prizes alongside the £1 million award in select draws.

26th July 2013 – The 100 UK Millionaires Raffle returned to give another 100 ticket holders the chance to become millionaires. This highly anticipated draw resulted in a huge increase in ticket sales but, in the event, left the previous record unchallenged when only 92 of the 100 £1 million prizes were claimed.

31st May 2013 – The £1 Million Every Month for a Year draw was held. Instead of the prize being worth £1 million, this draw offered one lucky player a prize of £12 million, paid in twelve £1 million monthly instalments.

27th July 2012 – The promotional 100 Millionaires draw on the night of the opening ceremony of the 2012 Olympic Games in London resulted in 97 of the 100 Millionaire Maker winners claiming their prize, breaking the world record for the most millionaires made in one night.

25th November 2011 – Millionaires Month began, awarding 50 £1 million prizes in the four weeks leading up to Christmas.

13th November 2009 – Millionaire Raffle was launched.

Christmas and New Year’s Special Draws

There are often special versions of the UK Millionaire Maker game held around the festive season which give away multiple raffle prizes. In the past, these games have been held on Christmas Day/Boxing Day and New Year’s Eve/New Year’s Day.

To read more about special festive draws, visit the Christmas and New Year’s EuroMillions pages for more information and to find out about upcoming events this year.

100 Millionaires

Occasionally, the UK Millionaire Maker will hold special editions of the game which will see 100 players win £1 million. Currently, the 100 UK Millionaire Raffle draw which took place on Friday 27th July 2012 holds the world record for making the highest number of lottery millionaires in one night after 97 of the 100 prizes were claimed.

Players receive one free entry into the UK Millionaire Maker for each line of EuroMillions numbers purchased and this remains the case regardless of how many Millionaire Maker prizes are on offer.

2016: January Blues Giveaway

  • Diane Allen from Doncaster was the ninth and final winner of the 2016 January Blues Giveaway, winning an Odeon Awards Season Gift Tin. When we spoke to Diane, she said: «Wow can’t believe I have won many thanks — looking forward to using the tickets»
  • Patricia Hancock from Stansted was the penultimate winner of the 2016 January Blues Giveaway, winning a £20 Sports Direct Voucher. When we spoke to Patricia, she told us: «What a lovely surprise to hear that I have won a sports Direct Voucher»
  • Anna Ingram from North Lincolnshire was the seventh winner of the Giveaway, winning a Bluedio Bluetooth Speaker. When we spoke to Anna, she said: «What a lovely way to start my day by being told I was a winner! I was lucky enough to win the Bluedio Speakers, and I am so looking forward to using them!»
  • Dale Askew from Surrey was the sixth winner of the 2016 January Blues Giveaway, winning 1kg of PhD Nutrition Diet Whey Protein. When we spoke to Dale, he said: «I’m delighted to be announced as a winner in the prize draw, I will be using the protein powder in my Nutribullet! Thank you so much!»
  • Ruth Wollerton from Peterborough was the fifth winner of the 2016 January Blues Giveaway, winning 10 EuroMillions tickets for the draw on 19th January! When we spoke to Ruth, she said: «I am so excited with my win, hopefully my numbers will come up.»
  • Rachel Bonness from Herefordshire was the fourth winner of the Giveaway, winning a Nutribullet! When we contacted Rachel, she said: «I was delighted I won as my resolution this year is to tone up at the gym & I wanted to create delicious protein smoothies after my workouts. My goal is going to be so much easier now!»
  • Nieyaati Masurkar from London was the third winner of the 2016 January Blues Giveaway, winning a Fitbit Charge HR. When we contacted Nieyaati, she said: «This is amazing! Can’t believe it! Bidding farewell for good to #JanuaryBlues Thank you guys! Thank you for giving me a chance to be more fit & healthy.»
  • Melissa Palmer from Lancashire was the second winner of the 2016 January Blues Giveaway, winning a set of bathroom scales. When we spoke to Melissa, she said: «Thank you so much im very happy never thought i would be lucky enough to win thank you»
  • Aimee Herrington from Nuneaton was the first winner of the 2016 January Blues Giveaway, winning a month’s Pure Gym membership. When we contacted Aimee, she said: «When I got told I had won I was really happy and proud :)»

How to Identify a EuroMillions Lottery Scam

  • It is not possible to win a EuroMillions prize, raffle, sweepstake or competition that you have not entered. If you receive a notification informing you that you have won a prize in a game you have never played, it is a scam.
  • To win a EuroMillions prize, you must have purchased a ticket for the correct draw date and your number selection must match the balls required to win the relevant prize.
  • You do not win EuroMillions prizes based on randomly selected mobile phone numbers or email addresses, including for games which you did not enter.
  • EuroMillions will not ask you to pay any type of ‘fee’ to receive your prize.
  • EuroMillions will not ask you to pay the ‘tax’ due on the win in advance of receiving a prize.

Clues to Identify a Scam

All of the points listed below are usually a good indication that the winning notification you have received is a scam:

  • The email has been sent from a free webmail address (for example @hotmail.com, @outlook.com or @yahoo.com) or from an unrelated address that could have been compromised.
  • The letter or email does not address you personally but instead starts with something vague like ‘Dear Winner’. This may not always be the case, however, so don’t assume the message is genuine just because it uses your name.
  • Scam letters are often on poor quality, photocopied letterhead (although some will include a genuine business address in an attempt to provide legitimacy). It is worth noting that not all scam letters are of a low quality; scammers are constantly updating and improving technology so their messages may appear more legitimate.
  • There is often a strict time limit to claim the ‘prize’. This is intended to put the potential victim under pressure and deter them from seeking advice or investigating the matter further.
  • Confidentiality is often demanded as a ‘condition of winning’. Again, this is to deter the recipient from seeking the advice of friends or family who may be more familiar with this type of scam.
  • The communication may contain complicated language and jargon, such as ticket numbers and ‘batch’ references in an attempt to give the document an ‘official’ feel.
  • Poor spelling, grammar and syntax are usually a good indication that the letter or email is a scam.
  • A photocopy of a cheque with your name on it may be contained within the communication to entice you into sending funds, something which real lotteries would never do.
  • Some scams may claim to be from Euro-Millions.com, but please remember that we will never contact you under any circumstances to say you have won a prize. Any prize notifications that supposedly originate from Euro-Millions.com are fraudulent.
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